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PROGRAMS & COURSES \ CATALOG

HIST 191 Principles of Atatürk and the History of the Turkish Revolution I 2 Credits
This basic, comprehensive survey of the politics, economics and sociology of Turkish modernization begins with a review of the pressures building up on the Ottoman Empire, and the recurring confrontations between the conservative and the reform-minded wings of the ruling elite, through the 17th and 18th centuries, dovetailing into the challenges confronting the porte under Selim III and Mahmud II. The long drawn-out tragedy of the Turkish 19th century, comprising: a context of continuing retreat and territorial contraction, as well as of deepening despair, summed up as a non-colonial pattern of incorporation; the complicated relationships between the Great Powers and the various Balkan nationalisms; the initial introduction and the subsequent expansion of modernization agendas from the top down; the interplay of political and economic factors, and of local vs international forces, in the major crises of the 1830s, the 1850s, and the 1870s; the course of restructuring in the legal, administrative, educational, fiscal and economic spheres; the ancien régime complexity set up by Tanzimat dualisms; the Ottomans' ambition to modernize and to be recognized as modern (and hence of being admitted into the Concert of Europe); the gradual emergence of a state of law, and the replacement of the First Constitution's abortive liberalism by the resurgent authoritarianism of the Hamidian era.

Last Offered Terms Course Name SU Credit
Spring 2017-2018 Principles of Atatürk and the History of the Turkish Revolution I 2
Fall 2017-2018 Principles of Atatürk and the History of the Turkish Revolution I 2
Spring 2016-2017 Principles of Atatürk and the History of the Turkish Revolution I 2
Fall 2016-2017 Principles of Atatürk and the History of the Turkish Revolution I 2
Summer 2015-2016 Principles of Atatürk and the History of the Turkish Revolution I 2
Spring 2015-2016 Principles of Atatürk and the History of the Turkish Revolution I 2
Fall 2015-2016 Principles of Atatürk and the History of the Turkish Revolution I 2
Summer 2014-2015 Principles of Atatürk and the History of the Turkish Revolution I 2
Spring 2014-2015 Principles of Atatürk and the History of the Turkish Revolution I 2
Fall 2014-2015 Principles of Atatürk and the History of the Turkish Revolution I 2
Spring 2013-2014 Principles of Atatürk and the History of the Turkish Revolution I 2
Fall 2013-2014 Principles of Atatürk and the History of the Turkish Revolution I 2
Summer 2012-2013 Principles of Atatürk and the History of the Turkish Revolution I 2
Spring 2012-2013 Principles of Atatürk and the History of the Turkish Revolution I 2
Fall 2012-2013 Principles of Atatürk and the History of the Turkish Revolution I 2
Spring 2011-2012 Principles of Atatürk and the History of the Turkish Revolution I 2
Fall 2011-2012 Principles of Atatürk and the History of the Turkish Revolution I 2
Spring 2010-2011 Principles of Atatürk and the History of the Turkish Revolution I 2
Fall 2010-2011 Principles of Atatürk and the History of the Turkish Revolution I 2
Spring 2009-2010 Principles of Atatürk and the History of the Turkish Revolution I 2
Fall 2009-2010 Principles of Atatürk and the History of the Turkish Revolution I 2
Spring 2008-2009 Principles of Atatürk and the History of the Turkish Revolution I 2
Fall 2008-2009 Principles of Atatürk and the History of the Turkish Revolution I 2
Fall 2007-2008 Principles of Atatürk and the History of the Turkish Revolution I 2
Fall 2006-2007 Principles of Atatürk and History of Turkish Revolution I 2
Fall 2005-2006 Principles of Atatürk and History of Turkish Revolution I 2
Fall 2004-2005 The Making of Modern Turkey I 2
Fall 2003-2004 The Making of Modern Turkey I 2
Fall 2002-2003 The Making of Modern Turkey I 2
Fall 2001-2002 The Making of Modern Turkey I 2
Fall 2000-2001 The Making of Modern Turkey I 2
Spring 1999-2000 The Making of Modern Turkey I 2
Fall 1999-2000 The Making of Modern Turkey I 2

Prerequisite: __
Corequisite:
ECTS Credit: 4 ECTS / 3 ECTS (for students admitted in the 2013-14 Academic Year or following years)
General Requirements:
 
HIST 192 Principles of Atatürk and the History of the Turkish Revolution II 2 Credits
The''revolution vs empire''dilemna faced by the Young Turks in 1908 ,continuing into:the intellectual ferment of the first two decades of the century ;the impact of the Balkan Wars and of Gallipoli on Turkish nationalism; the beginnings of an Anatolia -oriented populism;the fatique and despair of 1918-19 ,and the call to mobilize for one last struggle ;the forging of a new leadership and of a program of resistance ; and the role of local and national elements in the grand alliance for independence.From 1923 onwards,attention shifts to : economic reconstruction; the ''smashing the idols'' refoms of the 1920s and early 30s;education,history, archeology,folklore,and the construction of a new national identity;the Great Depression and the shift to a more statist economic policy; the difficulties of the war years; and the 1946-50 transition to parliamentary pluralism.In conclusion ,the course raises some broad analytical questions : the Kemalist revolution in comparative perspective; the emergence and development of a ''catching up agenda'' in a non -colonial context;the pragmatism and empiricism of Kemalism contrasted with other (later)examples of national developmentalism; the prospects for Turkish democracy on the threshold of the 21st century.

Last Offered Terms Course Name SU Credit
Spring 2017-2018 Principles of Atatürk and the History of the Turkish Revolution II 2
Fall 2017-2018 Principles of Atatürk and the History of the Turkish Revolution II 2
Summer 2016-2017 Principles of Atatürk and the History of the Turkish Revolution II 2
Spring 2016-2017 Principles of Atatürk and the History of the Turkish Revolution II 2
Fall 2016-2017 Principles of Atatürk and the History of the Turkish Revolution II 2
Summer 2015-2016 Principles of Atatürk and the History of the Turkish Revolution II 2
Spring 2015-2016 Principles of Atatürk and the History of the Turkish Revolution II 2
Fall 2015-2016 Principles of Atatürk and the History of the Turkish Revolution II 2
Summer 2014-2015 Principles of Atatürk and the History of the Turkish Revolution II 2
Spring 2014-2015 Principles of Atatürk and the History of the Turkish Revolution II 2
Fall 2014-2015 Principles of Atatürk and the History of the Turkish Revolution II 2
Spring 2013-2014 Principles of Atatürk and the History of the Turkish Revolution II 2
Fall 2013-2014 Principles of Atatürk and the History of the Turkish Revolution II 2
Summer 2012-2013 Principles of Atatürk and the History of the Turkish Revolution II 2
Spring 2012-2013 Principles of Atatürk and the History of the Turkish Revolution II 2
Fall 2012-2013 Principles of Atatürk and the History of the Turkish Revolution II 2
Spring 2011-2012 Principles of Atatürk and the History of the Turkish Revolution II 2
Fall 2011-2012 Principles of Atatürk and the History of the Turkish Revolution II 2
Spring 2010-2011 Principles of Atatürk and the History of the Turkish Revolution II 2
Fall 2010-2011 Principles of Atatürk and the History of the Turkish Revolution II 2
Spring 2009-2010 Principles of Atatürk and the History of the Turkish Revolution II 2
Fall 2009-2010 Principles of Atatürk and the History of the Turkish Revolution II 2
Spring 2008-2009 Principles of Atatürk and the History of the Turkish Revolution II 2
Spring 2007-2008 Principles of Atatürk and the History of the Turkish Revolution II 2
Spring 2006-2007 Principles of Atatürk and History of Turkish Revolution II 2
Spring 2005-2006 Principles of Atatürk and History of Turkish Revolution II 2
Spring 2004-2005 The Making of Modern Turkey II 2
Spring 2003-2004 The Making of Modern Turkey II 2
Spring 2002-2003 The Making of Modern Turkey II 2
Spring 2001-2002 The Making of Modern Turkey II 2
Spring 2000-2001 The Making of Modern Turkey II 2
Spring 1999-2000 The Making of Modern Turkey II 2

Prerequisite: HIST 191 - Undergraduate - Min Grade D
Corequisite:
ECTS Credit: 4 ECTS / 3 ECTS (for students admitted in the 2013-14 Academic Year or following years)
General Requirements:
 
HIST 205 History of the Twentieth Century 3 Credits
The first half of the 20th century witnessed catastrophic destruction through world wars and genocides; its third quarter, in contrast, became a period of unprecedented stability and affluence; this, however, gave way to yet another phase of collapse and epochal change that marked not only the end of the century but perhaps also the end of the entire Modern Era. This course proposes to look at all this social and political tumult, as well as the accompanying history of culture, ideas, art and science, through the works and overlapping yet diverging interpretations of some its major observers and commentators.

Last Offered Terms Course Name SU Credit
Fall 2017-2018 History of the Twentieth Century 3
Fall 2016-2017 History of the Twentieth Century 3
Spring 2015-2016 History of the Twentieth Century 3
Fall 2014-2015 History of the Twentieth Century 3
Fall 2013-2014 History of the Twentieth Century 3
Fall 2012-2013 History of the Twentieth Century 3
Fall 2011-2012 History of the Twentieth Century (HIST405) 3

Prerequisite: SPS 101 - Undergraduate - Min Grade D
and SPS 102 - Undergraduate - Min Grade D
Corequisite: __
ECTS Credit: 6 ECTS / 6 ECTS (for students admitted in the 2013-14 Academic Year or following years)
General Requirements:
 
HIST 221 Renaissance and Reformation Europe 3 Credits
European society and art c. 1300-1600. The cultural underpinnings of the transition from a horizontally organized world of regional civilizations and their relatively isolated great traditions, to a more vertically organized modern world-system. Individualism and its manifestations. Aspects of wealth and public space in the maritime city-states of Italy. Religious and civic humanism. Concentrations of talent in architecture, painting and sculpture from Florence to Rome and Venice. The Church from the late Middle Ages into the Early Modern Era. Critical independence, the printing press, and anti-clericalism. Luther at Worms: authority vs the individual conscience. The Protestant Reformation and the Catholic Counter-Reformation. Mannerism and the Baroque in Italy, Germany and northern Europe.

Last Offered Terms Course Name SU Credit

Prerequisite: SPS 101 - Undergraduate - Min Grade D
or SPS 102 - Undergraduate - Min Grade D
Corequisite: __
ECTS Credit: 6 ECTS / 6 ECTS (for students admitted in the 2013-14 Academic Year or following years)
General Requirements:
 
HIST 223 Women in Pre-Modern Societies 3 Credits
In recent decades, the feminist challenge to a male, ruling class dominated genre of history-writing from above has moved quickly from the 1960s' paradigm of women purely as "victims of patriarchy", through underscoring women's scope for autonomous counter-activity, to extricating "herstory" from "history" as virtually the only true and valid account. Today, though a re-integration is under way, focusing not on a separate "women's history" but on women in history - or even better, on historical women, whose real lives may be seen to have comprised a dimension of sharing and co-existence as well as a dimension of oppression and resistance. In HIST 223, all such issues and debates form part of the theoretical background that frames an empirical investigation of women's position, roles, and modes of activity in kin-based societies, in the early empires of Antiquity, in India and the Far East, in Greece and Rome, in medieval Christendom and Islamdom and in the Ottoman Empire.

Last Offered Terms Course Name SU Credit
Fall 2000-2001 Women in Pre-Modern Societies 3

Prerequisite: SPS 101 - Undergraduate - Min Grade D
or SPS 102 - Undergraduate - Min Grade D
Corequisite: __
ECTS Credit: 6 ECTS / 6 ECTS (for students admitted in the 2013-14 Academic Year or following years)
General Requirements:
 
HIST 227 History Goes to the Movies 3 Credits
Contrary to popular belief, historical "facts" do not speak for themselves, but are structured into different interpretations which acquire even greater degrees of autonomy as we move from scholarship to art. The course will revolve around a number of movies grouped around (a) themes ranging from war to religion or from royalty to peasant life; (b) periods ranging from Biblical times to World War II; (c) geographies extending from China to the Americas; and (d) production traditions ranging from Cinecitta to Hollywood. In each case, discussion will cover the historical period, event(s) or process(es) that the movie focuses on, as well as the role of the film-maker's vision in constructing that representation.

Last Offered Terms Course Name SU Credit
Fall 2009-2010 History Goes to the Movies 3
Fall 2008-2009 History Goes to the Movies 3
Fall 2005-2006 History Goes to Movies 3
Spring 2001-2002 History Goes to Movies 3

Prerequisite: SPS 101 - Undergraduate - Min Grade D
or SPS 102 - Undergraduate - Min Grade D
Corequisite: __
ECTS Credit: 6 ECTS / 6 ECTS (for students admitted in the 2013-14 Academic Year or following years)
General Requirements:
 
HIST 233 The Medieval Hero, East and West 3 Credits
Designed as an introduction to reading and analyzing epic narratives, this course focuses on four such key types of works re-introduced in writing during the Middle Ages : the Shahnama, the Oghuznama, the Alexander Romance, and the Arthurian Legends. Introduced at the outset will be the main themes and narrative tools employed in the construction of epics; the common features which make a ?hero?; and the relevant historical contexts. These will then be brought to bear on a close examination of the works in question, with the final case study of Alexander and the Romances serving to explore the common aspects of ?Eastern? and ?Western? epics and heroes. The course will conclude with a discussion of the afterlife of these epics.

Last Offered Terms Course Name SU Credit
Spring 2017-2018 The Medieval Hero, East and West 3
Spring 2016-2017 The Medieval Hero, East and West 3
Spring 2015-2016 The Medieval Hero, East and West 3
Spring 2014-2015 The Medieval Hero, East and West 3
Spring 2013-2014 The Medieval Hero, East and West 3

Prerequisite: __
Corequisite: __
ECTS Credit: 6 ECTS / 6 ECTS (for students admitted in the 2013-14 Academic Year or following years)
General Requirements:
 
HIST 242 The Age of Revolution 1789-1848 3 Credits
European society and art at a time of cataclysmic transformation, involving both the Industrial Revolution the creation of the material foundations of modern welfare, and the French Revolution and the forging of the political and cultural structures of mass democracy. The old regime, the Enlightenment, and the storm. Classicism, romanticism, realism. The art market and the reading public. Studies of genres, artists and works including Hogarth, David, Goya, Constable, Delacroix, Courbet, Turner; Wordsworth, Coleridge Blake, Shelley, Keats, Byron; Beethoven, Chopin, Wagner; the rise of the novel.

Last Offered Terms Course Name SU Credit

Prerequisite: SPS 101 - Undergraduate - Min Grade D
or SPS 102 - Undergraduate - Min Grade D
Corequisite: __
ECTS Credit: 6 ECTS / 6 ECTS (for students admitted in the 2013-14 Academic Year or following years)
General Requirements:
 
HIST 245 Men, Ships and the Sea 3 Credits
The history of shipbuilding and seafaring offers fascinating insights into the interaction between ecologies, technologies, incentives and ambitions, knowledge, production, and lifestyles. Human societies inhabiting coastal areas have developed various ship types both by way of utilising the available materials, and in order to cope with the specific problems posed by different seas or oceans. As a complicated piece of machinery, each such ship generates multiple technological demands on different sectors; it also becomes a part of dense patterns of human existence, comprising routes, movement, trade, exploration, and migrations. Combining social with technological history, the course proposes to explore these and other themes through the prism of five major ship types : a Mediterranean galley; an 18th century ship-of-the-line; a tea clipper; a dreadnought; and an ocean liner from the gilded age of transatlantic travel.

Last Offered Terms Course Name SU Credit
Fall 2016-2017 Men, Ships and the Sea 3
Spring 2015-2016 Men, Ships and the Sea 3
Spring 2013-2014 Men, Ships and the Sea 3
Spring 2011-2012 Men, Ships and the Sea 3
Spring 2009-2010 Men, Ships and the Sea (HIST345) 3
Fall 2008-2009 Men, Ships and the Sea (HIST345) 3
Spring 2005-2006 Men, Ships and the Sea (HIST345) 3
Spring 2004-2005 Men, Ships and the Sea (HIST345) 3
Spring 2003-2004 Men, Ships and the Sea (HIST345) 3
Fall 2002-2003 Men, Ships and the Sea (HIST345) 3

Prerequisite: SPS 101 - Undergraduate - Min Grade D
and SPS 102 - Undergraduate - Min Grade D
Corequisite: __
ECTS Credit: 6 ECTS / 6 ECTS (for students admitted in the 2013-14 Academic Year or following years)
General Requirements:
 
HIST 285 The Süleymanic Era 3 Credits
This course aims to analyze the political institutions and social organization of the Ottoman Empire at the time of its greatest impact in world history. The evolution of political ideas and institutions and the articulation of internal social mechanisms will be studied across the full spectrum of Ottoman involvement in European and Asian affairs - in diplomacy, warfare and trade as well as ideological and cultural contacts and interactions ranging from Renaissance Europe to flourishing Asian empires.

Last Offered Terms Course Name SU Credit

Prerequisite: SPS 101 - Undergraduate - Min Grade D
or SPS 102 - Undergraduate - Min Grade D
Corequisite: __
ECTS Credit: 6 ECTS / 6 ECTS (for students admitted in the 2013-14 Academic Year or following years)
General Requirements:
 
HIST 315 Episodes in the History of Science I 3 Credits
The course will begin with a quick survey of history of science from Antiquity to the present. It will then concentrate on the main aim, which is to try to have a better understanding of the emergence of the new science in central and western Europe following the Renaissance era. What are the cultural and social factors which helped this breakthrough, how did the results affect people's lifestyles and political views, and why did it take so many centuries for the scientific method to penetrate the Ottoman realm? These and other subjects will be discussed in a collective manner, many items will be assigned to students for deeper study, and new findings will bring important contributions to our understanding.

Last Offered Terms Course Name SU Credit
Fall 2011-2012 Episodes in the History of Science I 3
Fall 2010-2011 Episodes in the History of Science I 3
Fall 2009-2010 Episodes in the History of Science I 3
Spring 2008-2009 Episodes in the History of Science I 3
Fall 2005-2006 Episodes in the History of Science 3
Fall 2004-2005 Episodes in the History of Science 3
Fall 2003-2004 Episodes in the History of Science 3
Fall 2002-2003 Episodes in the History of Science 3

Prerequisite: SPS 101 - Undergraduate - Min Grade D
or SPS 102 - Undergraduate - Min Grade D
Corequisite: __
ECTS Credit: 6 ECTS / 6 ECTS (for students admitted in the 2013-14 Academic Year or following years)
General Requirements:
 
HIST 316 Episodes in the History of Science II 3 Credits
A sequel to HIST 315, which pursues the story of the further development of the sciences and their impact on society from the middle of the 19th century to the present, covering, together with the West, the history of science in both Ottoman and Republican Turkey. As in HIST 315, an episodic treatment requiring extensive student participation throughout.

Last Offered Terms Course Name SU Credit
Spring 2010-2011 Episodes in the History of Science II 3
Spring 2009-2010 Episodes in the History of Science II 3
Spring 2005-2006 Episodes in the History of Science II 3
Spring 2004-2005 Episodes in the History of Science II 3
Spring 2003-2004 Episodes in the History of Science II 3
Spring 2002-2003 Episodes in the History of Science II 3

Prerequisite: SPS 101 - Undergraduate - Min Grade D
or SPS 102 - Undergraduate - Min Grade D
Corequisite: __
ECTS Credit: 6 ECTS / 6 ECTS (for students admitted in the 2013-14 Academic Year or following years)
General Requirements:
 
HIST 323 Revolutions in History 3 Credits
What is a revolution? Are revolutions necessary and inevitable, hence universal? Is their balance sheet all positive or all negative ? Why, after an enduring revolutionist legacy, are revolutions being so strictly questioned today? Does "the end of history" mean "the end of revolutions" ? The course proposes to tackle these and other questions from a standpoint situated outside both the revolutionary and the anti-revolutionary discourses that have long dominated the intellectual scene. Attempting to construct a new, critical historiography of the subject, it draws on the evidence provided by a number of case studies on the English, the French, the Russian, the Kemalist and the Chinese revolutions, and works its way through a number of thinkers ranging from Burke and Tocqueville through Marx to Brinton, Skocpol, Furet or Hobsbawm, in order to problematize themes like the link between revolutions and modernity, the time-space distribution of revolutions, "normal" and "abnormal" politics, crises of legitimacy, the dialectics of leadership and mass support, stages of revolutionary action, violence and demonstrations of punishment, the radicalization and militarization of revolutions, European and non-European revolutions, and the alignments and legacies of revolutions. Also see HIST 623 for the possibility of being taken simultaneously as a graduate seminar subject to extra conditions and requirements.

Last Offered Terms Course Name SU Credit

Prerequisite: SPS 101 - Undergraduate - Min Grade D
or SPS 102 - Undergraduate - Min Grade D
Corequisite: __
ECTS Credit: 6 ECTS / 6 ECTS (for students admitted in the 2013-14 Academic Year or following years)
General Requirements:
 
HIST 324 A History of North America up to the Reconstruction Era 3 Credits
This is mainly a history of the English colonies and of the United States of America up to the third quarter of the 19th century. Topics to be dealt with include : Old and New World societies; what "discovery" entailed; exchange and transfer of people, germs, animals, plants and technology; Spanish vs English colonization; New England vs the Chesapeake Bay colonies; the importance of being Puritan; European rivalries and native alliances; England and the colonies; the Navigation Acts; indentured servitude and slavery; the American Revolution; the Constitution and the Bill of Rights; the initial growth and expansion of the United States; the North-South divide; religious / social reform and party politics; the debate over slavery vs Abolitionism; "states' rights" and the Civil War of 1861-1865.

Last Offered Terms Course Name SU Credit
Spring 2006-2007 A History Of North America Up To The Reconstruction 3
Fall 2004-2005 A History Of North America Up To The Reconstruction 3

Prerequisite: SPS 101 - Undergraduate - Min Grade D
or SPS 102 - Undergraduate - Min Grade D
Corequisite: __
ECTS Credit: 6 ECTS / 6 ECTS (for students admitted in the 2013-14 Academic Year or following years)
General Requirements:
 
HIST 326 Latin American History and Culture 3 Credits
This is a historical survey of the Latin American continent, organized around instances of encounter, disruption, exchange and creativity. Major themes to be dealt with comprise : colonial encounters and legacies, including especially the Columbian Exchange; the dynamics of slavery and slave societies; post-independence processes of nation-building; Latin America's post-/neo-colonial relationship to the United States; the 20th century predicaments of the region, ranging from dictatorships to genocide, from racism to modern day slavery and police violence. Following an interdisciplinary approach, the course surveys the literature as well as the film, music, literature and policy produced within the region, students will be exposed to ways of thinking about Latin American culture and society, as well as to how Latin American artists, writers and intellectuals represent their nations and cultures to themselves and to the world

Last Offered Terms Course Name SU Credit

Prerequisite: SPS 101 - Undergraduate - Min Grade D
and SPS 102 - Undergraduate - Min Grade D
Corequisite: __
ECTS Credit: 6 ECTS / 6 ECTS (for students admitted in the 2013-14 Academic Year or following years)
General Requirements:
 
HIST 331 Early Islamic History : A Survey 3 Credits
The course covers the period from the emergence of Islam to the end of Abbasid rule in Baghdad, and focuses on the central lands of Islam. After a chronological review of the political processes of expansion, state-formation, and decentralization, various aspects of social and intellectual life are examined. Topics to be covered include : the question of unity and diversity in Islamic history; the development of the religious sciences, law, political thought and philosophy; social hierarchies in theory and practice; and economic life and thought. For the possibility of being taken as a graduate course, subject to additional readings and work requirements, see HIST 531.

Last Offered Terms Course Name SU Credit
Fall 2017-2018 Early Islamic History : A Survey 3
Fall 2016-2017 Early Islamic History : A Survey 3
Summer 2008-2009 Early Islamic History : A Survey 3
Spring 2006-2007 Early Islamic History : A Survey 3
Spring 2005-2006 Early Islamic History : A Survey 3
Fall 2003-2004 Early Islamic History : A Survey 3
Fall 2002-2003 Early Islamic History : A Survey 3

Prerequisite: SPS 101 - Undergraduate - Min Grade D
or SPS 102 - Undergraduate - Min Grade D
Corequisite: __
ECTS Credit: 6 ECTS / 6 ECTS (for students admitted in the 2013-14 Academic Year or following years)
General Requirements:
 
HIST 332 Islamic History: the Middle Period (c.945 - 1500) 3 Credits
A continuing survey of Islamic history from around the middle of the 10th century, comprising: the deepening crisis of the Abbasid caliphate; mass conversions to Islam among non-Arab peoples (including the Karakhanids as well as the Volga Bulgars); the triumph of the Seljukid war-leadership over the Ghaznavids, and from 980 the overrunning of East Iran, then Mesopotamia, and eventually Asia Minor by this new Turkish warrior nobility. A first external shock in the form of the Crusades. With the breakup of the Greater Seljukids, the emergence of a series of independent Seljukid successor sultanates in Anatolia, Palestine, Syria, Iraq, Kirman and Iran; the triple division of the caliphate itself (between the Abbasids in Baghdad, the Fatimids in Egypt, and the Umayyads in Spain). A second external shock of the Mongol conquest. Finally, the rise of the Mamluks in Egypt, the Ottomans in northwest Anatolia and Rumelia, and the Safavids in Iranian space.

Last Offered Terms Course Name SU Credit
Spring 2017-2018 Islamic History: the Middle Period (c.945 - 1500) 3
Spring 2016-2017 Islamic History: the Middle Period (c.945 - 1500) 3

Prerequisite: __
Corequisite: __
ECTS Credit: 6 ECTS / 6 ECTS (for students admitted in the 2013-14 Academic Year or following years)
General Requirements:
 
HIST 341 War and Society II : The Military Revolution and the Genesis of the Modern State 3 Credits
This is the second in a series of five "period" courses revolving around the general theme of the social roots and determinants of warfare, and the impact of war on society. The series as a whole is designed to contribute to both the war-and-peace and the state-formation and state- theory dimensions of the SPS degree program, while this course in particular focuses on the second major threshold problematized by the new military history: the European development and crystallization of the modern state. Readings, ranging from Geoffrey Parker and Michael Howard, to Gabor Agoston and Rhoads Murphey, draw heavily on Charles Tilly's notion of "war-making and state-making as organized crime", as well as the literature on the "military revolution", which is seen as a new way of organizing fighting with gunpowder weapons. Crucial in this regard was the invention of a close-order infantry drill, though developments in siege and naval warfare were also important. This then impacted in all directions, transforming warriors into soldiers in order to effect one of the greatest homogenizations of modernity: armies in uniform, bearing standardized weapons, using standardized ammunition and undergoing constant training in order to achieve clockwork precision in carrying out standardized commands -- the same kind of mechanical precision that was overtaking the sphere of production through the division of labour in Adam Smith's manufactories. It also engendered enormous costs, forcing state apparatuses into functional specialization, bureaucratization, and the creation of national tax systems in order to pay for the supply lines and systems required by modern warfare. There were social consequences (in the form of process analysis); also existential consequences for non-European societies, including the Ottomans, who like a few other pre-modern empires were faced with the-do-or-die question of "importing the European army."

Last Offered Terms Course Name SU Credit
Spring 2001-2002 War and Society 2:The Military Revolution and the Genes. of the Modern State 3

Prerequisite: SPS 101 - Undergraduate - Min Grade D
or SPS 102 - Undergraduate - Min Grade D
Corequisite: __
ECTS Credit: 6 ECTS / 6 ECTS (for students admitted in the 2013-14 Academic Year or following years)
General Requirements:
 
HIST 348 Diplomatic History of the Modern Era I (1815-1950) 3 Credits
An overview of international politics and diplomacy from the Settlement of Vienna to the immediate aftermath of the Second World War. Weekly sub-themes to be pursued as issues both in diplomatic and military history, and in international law, include : (1) A general introduction focusing on the transformations wrought by the French Revolution; (2) the Congress of Vienna; (3) the Age of Restoration; (4) the Eastern Question and the Crimean War; (5) the Paris Conference and settlement; (6) the age of nationalisms and national unification; (7) the age of imperialism, and the emergence of permanent alliances or ententes; (8) World War I and the various treaties of Paris; (9) the League of Nations; (10) revisionism in Central Europe; (11) World War II and the birth of the UN; (12) de-colonization; (13) the onset of the Cold War.

Last Offered Terms Course Name SU Credit
Summer 2011-2012 Diplomatic History of the Modern Era I (1815-1950) 3
Spring 2003-2004 Diplomatic History of the Modern Era (1815-present) 3

Prerequisite: SPS 101 - Undergraduate - Min Grade D
or SPS 102 - Undergraduate - Min Grade D
Corequisite: __
ECTS Credit: 6 ECTS / 6 ECTS (for students admitted in the 2013-14 Academic Year or following years)
General Requirements:
 
HIST 349 Diplomatic History of the Modern Era II (1945-2004) 3 Credits
Aims to provide an overview of international developments from the Potsdam Conference down to the current issues of globalization and the emergence of USA as the only world power. Topics dealt with include : the origins of the Cold War; NATO and the Warsaw Pact; regional wars (Korea, Vietnam) and other crises (Berlin, Cuba, the Middle East); ); the partial thaw of the 1970s; the SALT agreements; the Third World and the Non-Alignment movement; the Helsinki Summit of 1975. Escalating tensions from the late 1970s into the 1980s (renewed nuclear buildups, together with crises in Grenada, Nicaragua, Afghanistan, and Ethiopia- Somalia). The disintegration of the USSR and the end of the Cold War. A new era of diplomatic and military instability, marked by US unilateralism, the emergence of China as a new power, the EU as another global player, continuing problems in Russia, "failed states" in the Third World, and global terrorism.

Last Offered Terms Course Name SU Credit
Fall 2016-2017 Diplomatic History of the Modern Era II (1945-2004) 3
Fall 2014-2015 Diplomatic History of the Modern Era II (1945-2004) 3
Fall 2013-2014 Diplomatic History of the Modern Era II (1945-2004) 3
Fall 2012-2013 Diplomatic History of the Modern Era II (1945-2004) 3
Spring 2011-2012 Diplomatic History of the Modern Era II (1945-2004) 3
Spring 2010-2011 Diplomatic History of the Modern Era II (1945-2004) 3
Fall 2008-2009 Diplomatic History of the Modern Era II (1945-2004) 3
Spring 2006-2007 Diplomatic History of Modern Times II (1945-2004) 3
Spring 2005-2006 Diplomatic History of Modern Times II (1945-2004) 3
Spring 2004-2005 Diplomatic History of Modern Times II (1945-2004) 3

Prerequisite: SPS 101 - Undergraduate - Min Grade D
or SPS 102 - Undergraduate - Min Grade D
Corequisite: __
ECTS Credit: 6 ECTS / 6 ECTS (for students admitted in the 2013-14 Academic Year or following years)
General Requirements:
 
HIST 370 History of a City I : From Byzantion to Constantinople 3 Credits
''A city capable of absorbing everything,'' is how the famous French historian Maurice Aymard described Constantinople / Istanbul in the 1970s. HIST 370 is designed to take students through the first two thousand years of this many-layered history, starting with a modest colony established by the Greek polis of Megara, growing through a crucial choice made by Constantine early in the AD 4th century into ''New Rome'', then rising and ultimately falling, in 1453, with the fortunes of the Byzantine empire. A historical introduction on these and other key phases will be followed by in-depth lectures many of which will be delivered on site in the course of study trips to leading Byzantine locations and monuments. A minimum of two such lecture hours per week will be complemented by intensive discussion sessions. For the possibility of taking ''History of a City I'' as a graduate course, subject to additional readings as well as research and writing requirements, see HIST 570.

Last Offered Terms Course Name SU Credit
Spring 2006-2007 History of a City I: From Byzantion to Constantinople 3

Prerequisite: SPS 101 - Undergraduate - Min Grade D
and HUM 202 - Undergraduate - Min Grade D
Corequisite: __
ECTS Credit: 6 ECTS / 6 ECTS (for students admitted in the 2013-14 Academic Year or following years)
General Requirements:
 
HIST 371 History of a City II : Ottoman Istanbul, 1450-1900 3 Credits
Beginning with a baseline survey of conditions prevailing shortly before the siege and eventual capture of Constantinople by Mehmed II in 1453, HIST 371, whether taken independently or as a sequel to HIST 370, is designed to take students from Ottoman Istanbul's initial re-building and repopulation, through its 16th century efflorescence as the capital of a new and resurgent empire, as well as through the manifold transformations of the 17th and 18th centuries, into the Tanzimat onset of modernity. Historical backgrounding lectures on these and other key phases or developments will be complemented with other, on site lectures in the course of study trips to leading Ottoman locations and monuments. For the possibility of proceeding from the ?taught course? components of HIST 371 to primary research at the advanced graduate level, see HIST 571.

Last Offered Terms Course Name SU Credit
Summer 2014-2015 History of a City II : Ottoman Istanbul, 1450-1900 3
Summer 2013-2014 History of a City II : Ottoman Istanbul, 1450-1900 3
Fall 2010-2011 History of a City II : Ottoman Istanbul, 1450-1900 3
Fall 2009-2010 History of a City II : Ottoman Istanbul, 1450-1900 3

Prerequisite: SPS 101 - Undergraduate - Min Grade D
and SPS 102 - Undergraduate - Min Grade D
Corequisite: __
ECTS Credit: 6 ECTS / 6 ECTS (for students admitted in the 2013-14 Academic Year or following years)
General Requirements:
 
HIST 385 The Ottomans, Europe and the World in the Sixteenth 3 Credits
Century A broad comparative perspective : political formations and societies in a century of quickened change. European ''early modern'' era compared with the Ottomans and other great Muslim empires (Safavi, Mughal), as well as with Ming China and the establishment of Tokugawa Japan. Social and political institutions; global reach of Atlantic Europe; claims, aspirations and objectives of Asian empires.

Last Offered Terms Course Name SU Credit
Summer 2016-2017 The Ottomans, Europe and the World in the Sixteenth 3
Summer 2010-2011 The Ottomans, Europe and the World in the Sixteenth 3
Summer 2009-2010 The Ottomans, Europe and the World in the Sixteenth 3
Summer 2008-2009 The Ottomans, Europe and the World in the Sixteenth 3
Fall 2008-2009 The Ottomans, Europe and the World in the Sixteenth 3
Spring 2006-2007 The Ottomans, Europe and the World in the Sixteenth Century 3

Prerequisite: __
Corequisite: __
ECTS Credit: 6 ECTS / 6 ECTS (for students admitted in the 2013-14 Academic Year or following years)
General Requirements:
 
HIST 397 Late Ottoman and Modern Turkish Foreign Policy 3 Credits
This course presents a detailed survey, based on primary source materials, of (a) the foreign policy orientations that the Ottoman state was forced to adopt in the face of developments originating in the realm of the Eurocentric international relations of the last quarter of the 19th century; and (b) the foreign policy course pursued by the modern Turkish Republic from the first quarter of the 20th century. Special attention will be devoted to exploring the inner connections between Turkey's foreign policy issues, and international politics in general, as well as the continuities and discontinuities of a critical century in the history of Turkish foreign policy. For the possibility of being taken as a graduate research seminar, subject to the condition of producing a major research paper based on primary sources, see HIST 697.

Last Offered Terms Course Name SU Credit
Spring 2005-2006 Late Ottoman and Modern Turkish Foreign Policy 3
Spring 2004-2005 Late Ottoman and Modern Turkish Foreign Policy 3
Spring 2003-2004 Late Ottoman and Modern Turkish Foreign Policy 3
Spring 2002-2003 Late Ottoman and Modern Turkish Foreign Policy 3
Spring 2001-2002 Late Ottoman and Modern Turkish Foreign Policy 3

Prerequisite: SPS 101 - Undergraduate - Min Grade D
or SPS 102 - Undergraduate - Min Grade D
Corequisite: __
ECTS Credit: 6 ECTS / 6 ECTS (for students admitted in the 2013-14 Academic Year or following years)
General Requirements:
 
HIST 406 The Twentieth Century Through Art and Literature 3 Credits
This course seeks not to familiarize students with a basic factography of the 20th century, but to guide them into explorations of the infinite variety of its human conditions -- perceived through great art, literature and films pertaining to its great tragedies, bunched for example around the horror of trench warfare; the promise and failure of revolutions; Fascism, Nazism and Stalinism; totalitarianisms and their camp systems; occupations and resistance movements; atrocities and genocides; life in the shadow of nuclear weapons; readings and meanings of the collapse of Communism; the rise, degeneration and fall of the Third World.

Last Offered Terms Course Name SU Credit
Spring 2014-2015 The Twentieth Century Through Art and Literature 3
Spring 2012-2013 The Twentieth Century Through Art and Literature 3

Prerequisite: SPS 101 - Undergraduate - Min Grade D
and SPS 102 - Undergraduate - Min Grade D
Corequisite: __
ECTS Credit: 6 ECTS / 6 ECTS (for students admitted in the 2013-14 Academic Year or following years)
General Requirements:
 
HIST 415 The Scientific Revolution 3 Credits
The Scientific Revolution of the 17th and 18th centuries did more than explain the motions of the heavenly bodies. It also invented scientific method. Thereby it established a new way of knowing. Furthermore, it built science, which was not even a distinct, recognizable activity up to that point, into the independent and centrally important institution that it has become in contemporary society, It was only from the mid-17th century onward, that the material, social, political and cultural conditions which have become integral parts of modern science emerged. Dealing with all these and other dimensions, this course will focus especially on the interaction between scientific ideas and the context that gave birth to them. It offers a gallery of sources and methods historians of science use to understand science in the past, and introduces students to reading and analyzing scientific texts, individuals and circumstances in history. The course also aims to encourage literacy across disciplines and faculties on the history of science.

Last Offered Terms Course Name SU Credit

Prerequisite: SPS 101 - Undergraduate - Min Grade D
and SPS 102 - Undergraduate - Min Grade D
Corequisite: __
ECTS Credit: 6 ECTS / 6 ECTS (for students admitted in the 2013-14 Academic Year or following years)
General Requirements:
 
HIST 423 Nature and Empires 3 Credits
What did empires look like on the ground? What can changing landscapes tell us about the history of imperialism or colonial societies, politics, and economies? How did local environments aid or constrain particular forms of empire? How did the study and use of nature contribute to the conquest and exploitation of foreign territories, or the expansion, administration, and upheaval of colonial regimes? This course will survey the recent scholarly literature on the global environmental history of empire, with emphasis on Early Modern and Modern European colonies. Special attention will focus on the environmental aspects of the reciprocal relationship between science (especially medicine, natural history, geography, and anthropology) and the making and unmaking of empires.

Last Offered Terms Course Name SU Credit

Prerequisite: SPS 101 - Undergraduate - Min Grade D
and SPS 102 - Undergraduate - Min Grade D
Corequisite: __
ECTS Credit: 6 ECTS / 6 ECTS (for students admitted in the 2013-14 Academic Year or following years)
General Requirements:
 
HIST 424 Family, Childhood and Gender in European History 3 Credits
Historical and cultural studies have previously discounted the history of the ''private life'', such that takes place within the intimate sphere of home. In that respect, women and children as individuals, and family, as a social entity were kept out of research and analysis for a long time. In the 1960s, however, social history had a pioneering and remarkable role as a major authority to change the status quo. Gender, childhood, and family came to be considered as significant sites of analysis and the consecutive decades brought about the formation of them into significant fields of inquiry. History of family, history of childhood, and gender history grew considerably in time and the last three decades have produced discrete historical studies that provide richly detailed accounts on these issues. Parallel with this trend, this course will specifically focus on family, gender, and childhood in Europe in order to provide an alternative version of studying European history.

Last Offered Terms Course Name SU Credit
Summer 2007-2008 Family, Childhood and Gender in European History 3

Prerequisite: __
Corequisite: __
ECTS Credit: 6 ECTS / 6 ECTS (for students admitted in the 2013-14 Academic Year or following years)
General Requirements:
 
HIST 425 The History of Childhood and Youth in Modern Europe and the Ottoman Empire 3 Credits
This course is devoted to comparative perspectives on the cultural, social, economic, and political history of childhood and youth in both 19th century Europe and the Ottoman Empire. More specifically, it will focus on how children as historical actors played a role in the history of their communities. An introduction on children in historiography will be followed by explorations of : European and Ottoman childhood(s) before the modern era; the ''discovery'' of childhood and youth in modern times; families and child-rearing; motherhood and fatherhood; policies and practices relating to education; policies and practices relating to Ottoman child labor; crime, criminalization, and juvenile delinquency; mechanisms of constructing adolescence; the sexuality of childhood and youth; orphans and non-family environments of growing up. The course will conclude with a preview of childhood and youth issues in modern Turkey.

Last Offered Terms Course Name SU Credit
Summer 2008-2009 The History of Childhood and Youth in Modern Europe and the Ottoman Empire 3

Prerequisite: SPS 101 - Undergraduate - Min Grade D
and SPS 102 - Undergraduate - Min Grade D
Corequisite: __
ECTS Credit: 6 ECTS / 6 ECTS (for students admitted in the 2013-14 Academic Year or following years)
General Requirements:
 
HIST 427 Education, Literacy, Printing 3 Credits
The history of education and literacy in Islamic and Ottoman societies from around 1400 to 1800 will be studied in comparative perspective. Topics will include : conceptions of reading and education in pre-modern societies; elite readers and elite reading matter; the diffusion of literacy and publishing; the social and political conditions for widespread printing in Tokugawa Japan; comparisons between pre-1800 modes and levels of literacy in the Russian and Ottoman empires.

Last Offered Terms Course Name SU Credit
Spring 2005-2006 Education, Literacy, Printing 3
Spring 2003-2004 Education, Literacy, Printing 3

Prerequisite: SPS 101 - Undergraduate - Min Grade D
or SPS 102 - Undergraduate - Min Grade D
Corequisite: __
ECTS Credit: 6 ECTS / 6 ECTS (for students admitted in the 2013-14 Academic Year or following years)
General Requirements:
 
HIST 431 Introduction to Byzantine History (AD 300-1453) 3 Credits
This course is an introduction to the society, politics, and culture of Byzantium. It covers the transformation of the Late Roman through the East Roman into the Byzantine empire, the role of the Byzantine church, the changing political, military, and economic fortunes of the empire over the centuries, as well as the everyday life of various social groups (including peasants, soldiers, monks, artisans, and women). Byzantium will be treated not in isolation, but in a broader world-context comprising its neighbors and political rivals, and focusing especially on its relations with the Papacy and the Holy Roman Empire, the Balkan Slavs, and contemporary Muslim powers. Readings will include a variety of printed primary sources in translation together with selections from the standard secondary literature.

Last Offered Terms Course Name SU Credit
Summer 2010-2011 Introduction to Byzantine History (AD 300-1453) 3
Summer 2008-2009 Introduction to Byzantine History (AD 300-1453) 3
Summer 2007-2008 Introduction to Byzantine History (AD 300-1453) 3
Fall 2005-2006 Introduction to Byzantine History (AD 300-1453) 3
Spring 2003-2004 Introduction to Byzantine History (AD 300-1453) 3

Prerequisite: SPS 101 - Undergraduate - Min Grade D
or SPS 102 - Undergraduate - Min Grade D
Corequisite: __
ECTS Credit: 6 ECTS / 6 ECTS (for students admitted in the 2013-14 Academic Year or following years)
General Requirements:
 
HIST 433 Medieval Europe: A Social and Economic History 3 Credits
Introduces the student to the basic shape and some fundamental problems of the European Middle Ages, and simultaneously to the works and ideas of a number of leading Medievalists. Topics dealt with include: a retrospective on the Renaissance and Enlightenment construction of the Middle Ages as part of a Eurocentric periodization. Axes of comparison between Ancient and Medieval civilization. Medieval Europe as a type of peasant (or tributary) society. Kingship and lordship; state-formation and class-formation. Paths into manorialism and serfdom. Determinants and patterns of fief distribution. The remoulding of old into new social classes. Factors accelerating the rise of private lordship. Church and state in the definition of Medieval society. Debates over "feudalism", and over comparisons between European feudalism and the Ottoman timar system. Processes and problems of High and Late Medieval history. Towns and trade. Forms of rent in transformation. From" feudal" to "national" monarchies: the growth of state power.

Last Offered Terms Course Name SU Credit
Fall 2004-2005 Medieval Europe: A Social and Economic History 3

Prerequisite: SPS 101 - Undergraduate - Min Grade D
or SPS 102 - Undergraduate - Min Grade D
Corequisite: __
ECTS Credit: 6 ECTS / 6 ECTS (for students admitted in the 2013-14 Academic Year or following years)
General Requirements:
 
HIST 434 Russian History I : Tsarist Russia (from the 17th Century to 1917) 3 Credits
This is a survey course on the general history of Russia from its early beginnings with the Muscovite state until World War I. It will begin with a general discussion on the geographical characteristics of Russia and the cultural peculiarities of the Russian population. Here the emphasis will be on the Eurasian dimension or character of the Russian lands. Strictly historical lectures will begin with Muscovy over 1450-1598, and will continue into the ''Time of Troubles,'' leading to the rise of the Romanov dynasty.The next issue will be the modernizing efforts of Peter the Great, and the political and social effects of these Petrine reforms (1682-1740). In the course of reviewing the policies of ''enlightened reform'' pursued by Catherine the Great (1762-1796), Russian expansionism against Poland and the Ottoman empire, as well as popular reactions such as the Pugachev Rebellion (1773-1775) will also be taken into account. Over the period between 1801-1855, the Napoleonic wars (1805-1815) and their impact, autocratic conservatism, and the Crimean War (1853-1856) will be highlighted. For the second half of the 19th century, attention fill focus on the emancipation of the serfs (1860), other administrative reforms and economic development accompanying expansion in Central Asia and Far East, and the emergence of a revolutionary opposition. The turbulent period of 1890-1914 will be discussed in terms of rapid industrialization, general poverty and popular unrest, defeat in the Russo-Japanese war and the subsequent 1905 revolution. The last weeks of the course will be devoted to World War I and the coming of the 1917 February and October revolutions.

Last Offered Terms Course Name SU Credit
Fall 2015-2016 Russian History I : Tsarist Russia (from the 17th Century to 1917) 3
Fall 2014-2015 Russian History I : Tsarist Russia (from the 17th Century to 1917) 3
Fall 2005-2006 Russian History I : Tsarist Russia (17th Century - 1917) 3

Prerequisite: SPS 101 - Undergraduate - Min Grade D
or SPS 102 - Undergraduate - Min Grade D
Corequisite: __
ECTS Credit: 6 ECTS / 6 ECTS (for students admitted in the 2013-14 Academic Year or following years)
General Requirements:
 
HIST 436 History of The Modern Middle East 3 Credits
A survey designed to introduce students to the basic themes and problems of Middle East history from the Ottoman conquest to the Oslo Peace Process, with special emphasis on the period from the late 18th to the late 20th century. The establishment of Ottoman rule over the Arab lands; Arab-Ottoman society and culture; European expansionism beginning from Napoleon's invasion of Egypt; the impact of the West in general; the coming of modern, reforming governments; the rise of the intelligentsia, of nationalism, and of Islamic revivalist modernism (salafiyya); Constitutionalism and constitutional revolutions in Iran and the Ottoman Empire. The collapse of the Ottoman order; imperialism and the zenith of European power; Arab struggles for independence; consolidation of the Yishuv and the birth of Israel; collapse of the European empires; the radicalisation of Arab politics; Nasserism, Baathist regimes in Syria and Iraq, the Iranian Revolution, and the Israeli-Palestinian question.

Last Offered Terms Course Name SU Credit
Fall 2012-2013 History of The Modern Middle East 3
Spring 2005-2006 History Of The Modern Middle East 3
Spring 2004-2005 History Of The Modern Middle East 3
Spring 2003-2004 History Of The Modern Middle East 3
Spring 2002-2003 History Of The Modern Middle East 3

Prerequisite: SPS 101 - Undergraduate - Min Grade D
or SPS 102 - Undergraduate - Min Grade D
Corequisite: __
ECTS Credit: 6 ECTS / 6 ECTS (for students admitted in the 2013-14 Academic Year or following years)
General Requirements:
 
HIST 437 Empires, Nations, and their Aftermath: Central and Eastern Europe in the 19th and 20th centuries 3 Credits
This course will introduce the modern history of Central and Eastern Europe through the prism of nationalism. First, attention will be paid to the relationship between nation and empire, specifically in the cases of the Habsburg and Russian empires. Themes addressed will include how empires incorporated, divided or excluded heterogeneous territories and peoples, and how the existence of multi-ethnic empires influenced nationalism and national movements in Central and Eastern Europe. Students will be encouraged to discuss parallels with the Ottoman case. The second main topic of the course concerns the role of nationalism in the breakup of empires, as well as the fate of their legacy in the form of the resulting successor-states. In other words, this part of the course will deal with the emergence of nation-states and the survival of nationalism in inter-war Europe, including the rise of National Socialism. Finally, without accepting the often-emphasized similarities of the dissolution of the Soviet Union with that of the Russian, Habsburg or Ottoman empires, the course will conclude with reflections on the role of nationalism in and after the collapse of the Communist bloc.

Last Offered Terms Course Name SU Credit
Fall 2003-2004 Empires, Nations, and their Aftermath: Central and Eastern Europe in the 19th and 20th centuries 3

Prerequisite: SPS 101 - Undergraduate - Min Grade D
or SPS 102 - Undergraduate - Min Grade D
Corequisite: __
ECTS Credit: 6 ECTS / 6 ECTS (for students admitted in the 2013-14 Academic Year or following years)
General Requirements:
 
HIST 438 The Economic History of the Middle East Since World War II 3 Credits
A critical overview of the processes of economic growth and transformation in the Middle East from World War II to the present. Countries to be studied include Egypt, Syria, Lebanon, Jordan, Iraq, the Arab states of the Arabian Peninsula, Iran and Turkey.

Last Offered Terms Course Name SU Credit
Summer 2008-2009 The Economic History of the Middle East Since World War II 3

Prerequisite: ECON 202 - Undergraduate - Min Grade D
Corequisite: __
ECTS Credit: 6 ECTS / 6 ECTS (for students admitted in the 2013-14 Academic Year or following years)
General Requirements:
 
HIST 439 Christians In The Ottoman Empire 3 Credits
This course offers to examine the history and condition of Christians -- a majority of whom were the Greek Orthodox people (Rum) -- in Anatolia and the Balkans under the Ottoman Empire. From some basic concepts of non- Muslim historiography (such as zımmi or millet), the course will move to the various ways in which historians have interpreted the Christian presence under Ottoman rule. Byzantium as a state was very closely associated with Orthodox Christianity and the Greek language. What did its demise mean for Orthodox Christians and their institutions ? How did Ottoman social, economic and administrative structures absorb and influence Christians; in turn, how did they participate in producing and re-producing the imperial framework ? Special attention will be paid to : communal life and institutions, the place of Christians in Ottoman administration and imperial networks, the Phanariots, the rise of the Greek bourgeoisie, the emergence of the Greek nation-state, Greek education, and the contribution of Christians to Ottoman urban space and architecture.

Last Offered Terms Course Name SU Credit

Prerequisite: __
Corequisite: __
ECTS Credit: 6 ECTS / 6 ECTS (for students admitted in the 2013-14 Academic Year or following years)
General Requirements:
 
HIST 441 The Enlightenment World 3 Credits
This is an upper-level seminar course dealing with the intellectual history of the 18th century, covering aspects of the Enlightenment, as well as its wider reception, in France, Germany, Italy, and the British Isles. It examines the development of ideas on philosophy, religion, ethics, law, the economy, politics, and society, which had an impact on the historical arena at this time. It is intended to enable students to acquire a sound knowledge of the key figures of the European Enlightenment movement; to develop an overall grasp of the contribution of the European Enlightenment to the fields of literature, science, philosophy, and political and ethical theory; and to acquire an up-to-date understanding of modern critical historiography on the Enlightenment.

Last Offered Terms Course Name SU Credit
Spring 2012-2013 The Enlightenment World 3

Prerequisite: __
Corequisite: __
ECTS Credit: 6 ECTS / 6 ECTS (for students admitted in the 2013-14 Academic Year or following years)
General Requirements:
 
HIST 443 War and Society IV: World War I and the Ottoman Empire 3 Credits
As the watershed between the ''long 19th'' and the ''short 20th century'', the Great War cuts across many national histories. In particular, it marks the twilight of empires. This course will take a close look at both the general and the Ottoman-Turkish experience of 1914-18. Aspects covered will include : the New Imperialism background; the road to war; the unfolding of military action, and the various fronts and campaigns, in Europe and elsewhere; the new war economies; the carnage at the front and various other forms of human suffering behind the lines; dimensions of ethnic cleansing; ; the impact on art and literature; social and political consequences.

Last Offered Terms Course Name SU Credit
Summer 2008-2009 War and Society IV: World War I and the Ottoman Empire 3

Prerequisite: __
Corequisite: __
ECTS Credit: 6 ECTS / 6 ECTS (for students admitted in the 2013-14 Academic Year or following years)
General Requirements:
 
HIST 447 Palestine versus the Palestinians 3 Credits
There is a tremendous tension between the historical evolution of ?Palestine? as a territorial unit, on the one hand; and of the ?Palestinians? as a people, on the other. Instead of a natural fit between identity and territory, it is as if one can only exist at the expense of the other. Why is it that Palestine resists belonging to its inhabitants? How and when did they become a ?people?? And can they become a single political community, divided as they are into Palestinian citizens of Israel; ?residents? of Occupied Territories, and stateless refugees? To explore these questions students are introduced to recent scholarship on the modern history of Palestine and the Palestinians that unsettles nationalist narratives and imagines alternative futures.

Last Offered Terms Course Name SU Credit
Summer 2014-2015 Palestine versus the Palestinians 3
Summer 2013-2014 Palestine versus the Palestinians 3

Prerequisite: __
Corequisite: __
ECTS Credit: 6 ECTS / 6 ECTS (for students admitted in the 2013-14 Academic Year or following years)
General Requirements:
 
HIST 450 The Eastern Question, 1768-1923 3 Credits
A survey of the ideological, political and military processes and structurations attending, and developing through, nearly two centuries of attempts by the European Great Powers of the 18th and especially the 19th centuries to partition the Ottoman Empire, eventually designated as the Sick Man of Europe. Also see HIST 650 for the possibility of being taken as a graduate seminar subject to the fulfillment of the necessary conditions for a research seminar in History.

Last Offered Terms Course Name SU Credit
Fall 2009-2010 The Eastern Question, 1768-1923 3
Fall 2002-2003 The Eastern Question, 1768-1923 3

Prerequisite: SPS 101 - Undergraduate - Min Grade D
or SPS 102 - Undergraduate - Min Grade D
Corequisite: __
ECTS Credit: 6 ECTS / 6 ECTS (for students admitted in the 2013-14 Academic Year or following years)
General Requirements:
 
HIST 455 History of the Balkan Lands up to the Early 19th Century and the Onset of Tanzimat Modernization 3 Credits
This course is designed to introduce undergraduate students with some initial knowledge of key Ottoman institutions, to the pre-modern history of the Balkan peoples during the Ottoman centuries. But it may also provide useful backgrounding for graduate students interested in focusing on Modern Balkan History, or on Late Ottoman and Modern Turkish History complemented by a comparative knowledge of modern Balkan dimensions. The main themes to be dealt with may include : the Balkans as a region; the Balkans on the eve of the Ottoman conquest; the Ottoman expansion into southeast and then towards central Europe; the impact of the wars of Ottoman conquest on the Balkan peoples; establishing Ottoman authority in the Balkans : the specifics of the administration and status of the Balkan territories; questions of self-rule; administrative and judicial institutions in the Balkan provinces of the Ottoman empire; agrarian relations; towns and urban society; Islam in the Balkans; colonisation and Islamisation; the organisation of the religious and cultural life of non-Muslim Ottoman subjects; questions of communal status; the cultural life of the Balkan peoples during the 15th - 18th centuries; the Balkan provinces during the 18th and the early 19th centuries; the emergence of the Eastern Question; characteristic features of the Balkan Awakenings as a cultural and economic phenomenon -- the Enlightenment and Romanticism, the genesis and specific features of Balkan capitalism, the Serbian Uprisings and the formation of the Serbian vassal principality; the Greek War of Independence and the formation of the Greek kingdom. Assessment will be based on a written paper and a final examination.

Last Offered Terms Course Name SU Credit
Fall 2003-2004 History of the Balkan Lands up to the Early 19th century and the Onset of Tanzimat Modernization: 3

Prerequisite: SPS 101 - Undergraduate - Min Grade D
or SPS 102 - Undergraduate - Min Grade D
Corequisite: __
ECTS Credit: 6 ECTS / 6 ECTS (for students admitted in the 2013-14 Academic Year or following years)
General Requirements:
 
HIST 461 Ottoman Reform Movements I (1550-1839) 3 Credits
Introduction to classical Ottoman political thought. Increasing consciousness of political and social crisis, exemplified in the writings of Kınalızade and Gelibolulu Mustafa Âli. Attempts to return to the past during the 17th century, as seen in the Kadızadeli movements and the reports of Koçibey. Early tendencies of partial Westernization in the 18th century, as reflected in the Tulip Era or the thinking of the likes of İbrahim Müteferrika and Yirmisekiz Çelebi Mehmet Efendi. The Nizâm-ı Cedid and the beginnings of institutional modernization (1792- 1807). Reactions against reform : Halet Efendi. The centralizing policies and reforms of Mahmud II (1808-1839), and local resistance.

Last Offered Terms Course Name SU Credit
Fall 2002-2003 Ottoman Reform Movements I (1550-1839) 3

Prerequisite: SPS 101 - Undergraduate - Min Grade D
or SPS 102 - Undergraduate - Min Grade D
Corequisite: __
ECTS Credit: 6 ECTS / 6 ECTS (for students admitted in the 2013-14 Academic Year or following years)
General Requirements:
 
HIST 462 Ottoman Reform Movements II:Political and Social Reforms (1839-1918) 3 Credits
Intellectual and social issues that are still very much alive in present-day Turkey have their antecedents in the 19th century Ottoman empire. The Ottoman 19th century was a period where old and new, reform and reaction met and mingled, and simultaneously confronted each other. This was also a time when the empire was shaken by a series of wars and crises of disintegration. Reformist bureaucrats implemented policies intended to forestall this process, while the intelligentsia vehemently opposed authoritarian reforms. Debates around the future of the empire became most fruitful during the first four years of the Second Constitutional Period (1908-1912), when people enjoyed some degree of liberal freedom. But public discussion came to an abrupt end when the Committee of Union and Progress established its military dictatorship (1913-1918). As a whole, this ''long 19th century'' was when the institutional foundations of Turkish modernization were laid down. This course aims to introduce, discuss, and understand Ottoman reform movements and ideas of the last hundred years of Ottoman existence, based on evaluations of reformist statesmen of the Tanzimat period, of oppositional intellectuals of the 1860s and 1870s, of the conservative stance adopted by Hamidian absolutism (1878-1908), and the Young Turk reformist ideas of the last decades of the Ottoman empire (1889-1918).

Last Offered Terms Course Name SU Credit
Fall 2007-2008 Ottoman Reform Movements II:Political and Social Reforms (1839-1918) 3
Fall 2004-2005 Ottoman Reform Movements II: Political and Social (1839-1918) 3
Spring 2002-2003 Ottoman Reform Movements II: Political and Social (1839-1918) 3

Prerequisite: SPS 101 - Undergraduate - Min Grade D
or SPS 102 - Undergraduate - Min Grade D
Corequisite: __
ECTS Credit: 6 ECTS / 6 ECTS (for students admitted in the 2013-14 Academic Year or following years)
General Requirements:
 
HIST 463 Social and Economic History of the Ottoman Empire 3 Credits
Over the last few decades, methodological insightsof of a comparative and inter-disciplinary nature have triggered major challenges to the textbook notion of a glorious Ottoman ''classical age'' followed by perpetual ''decline'' until the onset of Westernizing reforms in the 19th century. To be counterposed to the static nature of this traditional paradigm is a dynamic, historical treatment of socio-economic transformations and continuities over 1300-1800. Issues to be covered include : land tenure; the organization of urban production, trade, and credit relations; the challenge posed by the rise of the modern world system; family and gender relations; ethnic and religious diversity; intellectual life; popular culture and forms of plebeian protest; the mechanisms of social and political control; and relations between state and society.

Last Offered Terms Course Name SU Credit
Fall 2013-2014 Social and Economic History of the Ottoman Empire 3
Fall 2009-2010 Social and Economic History of the Ottoman Empire 3
Spring 2007-2008 Social and Economic History of the Ottoman Empire 3
Fall 2006-2007 Social and Economic History of the Ottoman Empire (HIST363) 3
Spring 2005-2006 Social and Economic History of the Ottoman Empire (HIST363) 3
Spring 2004-2005 Social and Economic History of the Ottoman Empire (HIST363) 3
Spring 2002-2003 Social and Economic History of the Ottoman Empire (HIST363) 3

Prerequisite: SPS 101 - Undergraduate - Min Grade D
and SPS 102 - Undergraduate - Min Grade D
Corequisite: __
ECTS Credit: 6 ECTS / 6 ECTS (for students admitted in the 2013-14 Academic Year or following years)
General Requirements:
 
HIST 473 Approaches to Agrarian Societies 3 Credits
In the last two decades the social sciences have become increasingly urban-biased. While cities, slums, skyscrapers and urban dwellers have crowded the stage, peasants and agricultural life have vanished from it. This course aims to bring agrarian societies back into scholarly attention. It examines agrarian societies in the modern era from a comparative historical and theoretical perspective. Topics to be investigated include : approaches to agrarian history and sociology; typologies of peasant societies and economies; ways in which forces of commercialization, industrialization and urbanization have been imprinting themselves on agrarian lives; systems of land tenure, moral economy debates, migration, peasant resistance and agency, and representations of agrarian societies or peasants in literature, film and other art.

Last Offered Terms Course Name SU Credit

Prerequisite: SPS 101 - Undergraduate - Min Grade D
and SPS 102 - Undergraduate - Min Grade D
Corequisite: __
ECTS Credit: 6 ECTS / 6 ECTS (for students admitted in the 2013-14 Academic Year or following years)
General Requirements:
 
HIST 475 Postorientalism and Postcolonialism 3 Credits
The term ?Postcolonialism? characterizes a loosely defined field of interdisciplinary perspectives, theories and methods that deal with dimensions of colonial rule in the past and its effects into the immediate present. Venturing to deconstruct colonial discourses and representations, Postcolonial Studies has had a deep imprint on humanities and social sciences in the last decades, and familiarity with it has become crucial to handling research literature on the Middle East. Given academic developments over the last forty years, of equal importance to scholars in this field is a viable Postorientalist approach. Along with Edward Said?s path-breaking work, students will also gain insight into other dimensions of postcolonial literature, such as Subaltern Studies originating in the attempt of South Asian scholars to come to terms with the legacy of British rule. The last third of the term will focus on applying all such theoretical insights to Middle Eastern, Ottoman and Turkey studies.

Last Offered Terms Course Name SU Credit
Fall 2015-2016 Postorientalism and Postcolonialism 3

Prerequisite: __
Corequisite: __
ECTS Credit: 6 ECTS / 6 ECTS (for students admitted in the 2013-14 Academic Year or following years)
General Requirements:
 
HIST 484 Peripheral Populations in the Ottoman Empire (1300-1914) 3 Credits
The Ottoman state considered itself to be the "protector of the ideal world order (nizâm-ı âlem)" and the center of justice. As part of this view, the Sublime Porte assumed a regulatory role towards what it regarded as the peripheral elements (such as heterodox communities, or tribal and nomadic groups) of the provincial population of the Balkans, Anatolia, and the Arab lands. In the 19th century era of reforms, adopting the ''rational order'' and ''progress'' values of the European Enlightenment led to an even further enhancement of this role. Over the 17th and 18th centuries, on the other hand, the provinces had been governed by local gentry and notables enjoying a de facto autonomy. Thus after 1774, the centralizing and regulatory policies of reforming governments created new tensions between the center and the provinces. These tensions continued well into the late 19th century. This course aims to discuss this complex relationship between the center and peripheral populations from the 15th and 16th centuries onward, focusing on topics such as the New Order (Nizâm-ı Cedîd) reforms, Mahmud II's policies of centralization and provincial resistance, the issue of frontier regions (Bosnia, Albania, Kurdistan), the problem of the sedentarization of tribal/nomadic populations, and ideological steps to integrate peripheral groups into the imperial framework (the Hamidian era and the Second Constitutional Period).

Last Offered Terms Course Name SU Credit
Fall 2003-2004 Peripheral Populations in the Ottoman Empire (1300-1914) 3

Prerequisite: SPS 101 - Undergraduate - Min Grade D
or SPS 102 - Undergraduate - Min Grade D
Corequisite: __
ECTS Credit: 6 ECTS / 6 ECTS (for students admitted in the 2013-14 Academic Year or following years)
General Requirements:
 
HIST 485 Minority Questions in Contemporary Turkey 3 Credits
First decolonization and then the end of the Cold War have led to new waves of transnational movement. Mass immigration and floods of refugees have given rise to economic, social and cultural clashes, feeding into fresh problems of ethno-religious otherization that have come to haunt even the normally most stable and tolerant democracies of Europe. Simultaneously, Turkey's EU process is bringing into question a number of minority issues that are the legacy of the transition from the multi-ethnic Ottoman empire into Balkan, Caucasian and Middle Eastern nation-states. What are these questions? Which groups are involved? How can cultural, linguistic and religious rights be applied to the relationship between majority and minority groups at the national and international levels? How can consciousness of ethnic, religious or cultural diversity be fostered and promoted as a common value? It is to such historical and contemporary problems that SPS 485 is addressed. For the possibility of taking this course at a graduate level, subject to certain additional requirements, see HIST 585.

Last Offered Terms Course Name SU Credit
Spring 2017-2018 Minority Questions in Contemporary Turkey 3
Summer 2016-2017 Minority Questions in Contemporary Turkey 3
Fall 2015-2016 Minority Questions in Contemporary Turkey 3
Summer 2014-2015 Minority Questions in Contemporary Turkey 3
Fall 2014-2015 Minority Questions in Contemporary Turkey 3
Summer 2013-2014 Minority Questions in Contemporary Turkey 3
Spring 2012-2013 Minority Questions in Contemporary Turkey 3
Fall 2008-2009 Minority Questions in Contemporary Turkey 3
Spring 2007-2008 Minority Questions in Contemporary Turkey (SPS485) 3
Spring 2006-2007 Minority Questions in Contemporary Turkey (SPS485) 3

Prerequisite: __
Corequisite: __
ECTS Credit: 6 ECTS / 6 ECTS (for students admitted in the 2013-14 Academic Year or following years)
General Requirements:
 
HIST 486 Topics in Armenian History and Literature 3 Credits
This course offers an opportunity for an initial encounter with Armenian history, culture and literature. Its specific focus may change from one term to the next, depending on the visiting instructor as well as on student interest. Thus it may entail an overall survey as well as much more in-depth penetration of special issues or problems. Both the themes and approaches involved may be interdisciplinary in nature, drawing upon anthropology, sociology or visual studies, too, along with history and literature.

Last Offered Terms Course Name SU Credit

Prerequisite: SPS 101 - Undergraduate - Min Grade D
and SPS 102 - Undergraduate - Min Grade D
Corequisite: __
ECTS Credit: 6 ECTS / 6 ECTS (for students admitted in the 2013-14 Academic Year or following years)
General Requirements:
 
HIST 487 Proto-Fascism in Europe and the Ottoman Empire 3 Credits
Situated at the junction of nationalism studies with the history of Fascism and Nazism, this course proposes to explore the formation of proto-fascism (including its various dimensions of racism, anti-semitism, Social Darwinism, radical modernism, authoritarian state-fetishism, nihilism, mysticism, the death urge and the Führer principle) in the late 19th and early 20th century -- first in its original European and then its Late Ottoman context, where it acquired secondary literature but also a number of primary sources (such as the key periodicals of the Second Constitutional period).

Last Offered Terms Course Name SU Credit
Summer 2012-2013 Proto-Fascism in Europe and the Ottoman Empire 3
Summer 2011-2012 Proto-Fascism in Europe and the Ottoman Empire 3

Prerequisite: __
Corequisite: __
ECTS Credit: 6 ECTS / 6 ECTS (for students admitted in the 2013-14 Academic Year or following years)
General Requirements:
 
HIST 488 Nationalist Projects in Southeast European History 3 Credits
The protracted decline and breakup of the Ottoman empire went hand in hand with the rise of a number of mutually antagonistic nationalisms which kept competing not only against the Porte but also against one another for political, ideological, and economic space. After initial, embryonic nation-statehood, such competition acquired irredentistic extensions. HIST 488 proposes to look at various such projects that culminated in great human tragedies in the early 20th century, the legacy of which endures to this day. Thus a brief introduction on theories of nation and nationalism will be followed by close examinations of : (1) the idea of a ''Greater Serbia'';(2) the rise of the ''Illyrianism'' (or Illyrismus) concept and the related notion of ''Yugoslavia'' in Croatia; (3) the role of state policy in the Greek megali idea; (4) Ottomanism (Osmanlılık) : an initial reaction against nationalist movements; (5) religion, ethnos, and nation in Bulgaria; (6) how ''constructed'' was the Macedonian nation; (7) the development of Albanian ''nationhood'' and the idea of a ''greater Albania''; (8) the rise and outlines of Turkish nationalism. The course will conclude with a review of nationalism and ''minorities'' questions today.

Last Offered Terms Course Name SU Credit
Spring 2011-2012 Nationalist Projects in Southeast European History 3
Spring 2008-2009 Nationalist Projects in Southeast European History 3
Spring 2007-2008 Nationalist Projects in Southeast European History 3
Fall 2006-2007 Nationalist Projects in Southeast European History 3

Prerequisite: __
Corequisite: __
ECTS Credit: 6 ECTS / 6 ECTS (for students admitted in the 2013-14 Academic Year or following years)
General Requirements:
 
HIST 489 From Empire to Republic : Turkish Nationalism and the Nation-State 3 Credits
A dense survey course on the making of Modern Turkey with a special focus on the ideological dimension of nation-building. Moves from multiple backgrounds (in : the broad outlines of Ottoman history; the ''long'' 19th century; the New Imperialism; Eurocentrism and Orientalism; racism and Social Darwinism), through Ottoman-Turkish elites? evolving love-and-hate relationship with the West, to the fashioning and grounding of a specifically Turkish (as against an Ottoman or a Muslim) identity in the throes of the protracted crisis of 1908-22. Makes considerable use of literature, too, to explore the myths of originism and authocthonism, as well as the ''golden age'' narratives, connected with both early and Kemalist varieties of Turkish nationalism. Also see HIST 589 for the possibility of being taken at the graduate level.

Last Offered Terms Course Name SU Credit
Fall 2017-2018 From Empire to Republic : Turkish Nationalism and the Nation-State 3
Fall 2016-2017 From Empire to Republic : Turkish Nationalism and the Nation-State 3
Fall 2015-2016 From Empire to Republic : Turkish Nationalism and the Nation-State 3
Summer 2014-2015 From Empire to Republic : Turkish Nationalism and the Nation-State 3
Fall 2014-2015 From Empire to Republic : Turkish Nationalism and the Nation-State 3
Fall 2013-2014 From Empire to Republic : Turkish Nationalism and the Nation-State 3
Fall 2012-2013 From Empire to Republic : Turkish Nationalism and the Nation-State 3
Fall 2011-2012 From Empire to Republic : Turkish Nationalism and the Nation-State 3
Fall 2010-2011 From Empire to Republic : Turkish Nationalism and the Nation-State 3
Fall 2009-2010 From Empire to Republic : Turkish Nationalism and the Nation-State 3
Spring 2008-2009 Texts and Constructions of National Memory I : Varieties of Early Turkish Nationalism 3
Fall 2003-2004 Texts and Const.of Nation.Memo.I: :Varieties of Early Turkish Nations 3

Prerequisite: SPS 101 - Undergraduate - Min Grade D
or SPS 102 - Undergraduate - Min Grade D
Corequisite: __
ECTS Credit: 6 ECTS / 6 ECTS (for students admitted in the 2013-14 Academic Year or following years)
General Requirements:
 
HIST 490 Texts and Constructions of National Memory II : Reading the Republican Historians 3 Credits
A critical approach to history-writing in the Republican era. The institutionalization and professionalization of History as an academic discipline. Historical backwardness, catching-up agendas, national developmentalism, and the "Prussian way" in Turkey. Nationalism, historians, and the state. The construction of a national canon from Akçura and Köprülü, through Barkan, to İnalcık. Universalism vs particularism. History from above vs history from below. Odd men out : Reşat Ekrem Koçu, Mustafa Akdağ. Debates over Islamic, Ottoman or Turkish identities/legacies as reflected in Art History. The contrasting worlds of historians and archeologists. The apertura of the 1950s and 60s. The advent of social and economic history. Debates over imperialism, underdevelopment, and pre-capitalist modes of production. The post-60s generation in History and the Social Sciences. For the possibility of taking this course as a graduate research seminar subject to the special requirement of producing a major research paper, see HIST 690.

Last Offered Terms Course Name SU Credit
Spring 2004-2005 Texts and Constructions of National Memory II : Reading the Republican Historians 3

Prerequisite: SPS 101 - Undergraduate - Min Grade D
or SPS 102 - Undergraduate - Min Grade D
Corequisite: __
ECTS Credit: 6 ECTS / 6 ECTS (for students admitted in the 2013-14 Academic Year or following years)
General Requirements:
 
HIST 491 Popular Culture and Nationalism 3 Credits
The popular realm of `everyday culture' is an important factor in explaining how nationalisms are produced and/or reproduced in people?s minds. This course studies how nationalism is fostered through history in popular materials such as cartoons, literary pieces, and films. In that context, it also deals with modernity, overlaps between imperialism and collapse of empires, nation building and history writing in official and unofficial realms. The focus in space and time as well as the key elements of the discussion may vary according to the instructor's choice. Special topics may include the influence of contemporary traumas in search for a mythical past, the differences between official and unofficial representations, the influence of state hegemony on different representations, popular representations of `self' and `other,' demonologies, alternative discourses in both popular narration and vision, how memories of war and trauma influence nation building at the popular realm and how and why it is different from the official one

Last Offered Terms Course Name SU Credit
Summer 2010-2011 Popular Culture and Nationalism 3
Summer 2008-2009 Popular Culture and Nationalism 3

Prerequisite: SPS 101 - Undergraduate - Min Grade D
and SPS 102 - Undergraduate - Min Grade D
Corequisite: __
ECTS Credit: 6 ECTS / 6 ECTS (for students admitted in the 2013-14 Academic Year or following years)
General Requirements:
 
HIST 492 War and Literature in Turkish History 3 Credits
Analyses of Turkish narratives or echoes of the Balkan Wars, World War I, the War of Independence, World War II, the Korean War, the war in Vietnam and other wars of the late 20th century. The full gamut of possible reactions to war : pain, horror, disgust; poverty, deprivation; exalted heroism; cowardice, profiteering, betrayal -- and how all this is rarely encountered as a totality in Turkish literature. Casting wars in social time and in monumental time. The question of just and unjust wars, or of "our" wars and wars that are waged "against us", and the erasures that this causes in narrating war experience. Problematizing the persistent lyricisation of warfare: why has Turkey not had any enduring pacifist of anti-militarist literary tradition ?

Last Offered Terms Course Name SU Credit

Prerequisite: SPS 101 - Undergraduate - Min Grade D
or SPS 102 - Undergraduate - Min Grade D
Corequisite: __
ECTS Credit: 6 ECTS / 6 ECTS (for students admitted in the 2013-14 Academic Year or following years)
General Requirements:
 
HIST 493 Caucasus and its Hinterland: Clans, Ethnicities and Nations in Imperial Borderlands 3 Credits
The Caucasus and its hinterland, which separate as well as connect the Pontic, the Caspian, and the Persian Gulf basins, have been a strategically important and therefore contested space since antiquity. In modern times, the region was at first fought over by the rival Muslim empires of the Ottomans and the Safavids. The entry of imperial Russia into the arena in the last decades of the eighteenth century ushered in the era of Christian predominance. The next century saw the penetration of the whole Muslim Middle East by western economic interests, accompanied by new conflicts and alignments both on intraregional and international levels. Whereas the evolution of the so-called Eastern Question that implied the settlement of the Ottoman succession parallel to Russian expansion into Transcaucasia encouraged the Christian populations of the region (the Georgians, the Armenians) to aspire to self-rule and even independence, the Muslims felt humiliated and feared a degradation of their traditional ways of life. Their reaction, beginning with the mountaineers' resistance to Russian colonization of the north Caucasus in the last decades of the eighteenth century and reaching its apex under the leadership of Imam Shamil (1834-1859), exacerbated by forced migrations of the Circassians and other Caucasian groups into Anatolia, entailed in the long run ethnic and religious violence in various forms, directed against both the neighbouring groups and the imperial centres. This development culminated in mass deportations and genocidal events during the two world wars of the twentieth century, ethnic conflict, nationalist secessionism and imperialist rivalries breaking out with new vigour in the post-Sovie era. The course will approach this complex history from the vantage point of the concept of "zones of violence", studying and discussing thereby the catastrophic experiences of the period within a multicausal framework

Last Offered Terms Course Name SU Credit
Spring 2009-2010 Caucasus and its Hinterland: Clans, Ethnicities and Nations in Imperial Borderlands 3
Fall 2007-2008 Caucasus and its Hinterland: Clans, Ethnicities and Nations in Imperial Borderlands 3

Prerequisite: __
Corequisite: __
ECTS Credit: 6 ECTS / 6 ECTS (for students admitted in the 2013-14 Academic Year or following years)
General Requirements:
 
HIST 494 Recent Turkish Political and Social History : Impressions and Inferences from Memoirs 3 Credits
This course is intended for all sophomores, juniors and seniors interested in the Ottoman everyday life of the 19th and early 20th centuries. It aims to introduce and discuss Ottoman socio-economic history on the basis of memoirs. After setting out the methodological uses and shortcomings of memoirs as a historical source, participants will have the opportunity to encounter concrete personalities and characters, their lifestyle, personal actions and drama as a part of late Ottoman history. Thus a glimpse will be provided into the recent past in terms of the complex relationship between concrete human action and impersonal historical circumstances. This course covers childhood experiences, school impressions, the social conditions of 19th century Ottoman women, commercial life, literary-artistic activities, journalistic experiences, and the everyday life of bureaucrats. Each of these issues will be treated within the context of Ottoman political and social history.

Last Offered Terms Course Name SU Credit
Summer 2009-2010 Recent Turkish Political and Social History : Impressions and Inferences from Memoirs 3
Spring 2002-2003 Recent Turkish Politics and Social History: Impressions and Inferences from Memoirs 3

Prerequisite: SPS 101 - Undergraduate - Min Grade D
or SPS 102 - Undergraduate - Min Grade D
Corequisite: __
ECTS Credit: 6 ECTS / 6 ECTS (for students admitted in the 2013-14 Academic Year or following years)
General Requirements:
 
HIST 497 Nations and Boundaries in the Middle East, the Balkans and the Caucasus 3 Credits
For advanced undergraduates as well as graduate students, a case-study based survey of the tortuous emergence of modern nations and nation-states, as well as of more "delayed" and "unfulfilled", therefore frustrated nationalisms, out of a matrix of ethno-confessional diversity, in the context of a decaying and disintegrating empire. The Great Powers, the new nationalisms, and the Porte. Modernization and nation-building. Converting millets into nations. Ambitions and their limits. Rival irredentisms. Claims of language, of history, of symbolic geography. Predictable tragedies : war and revolution; atrocities; forced migrations. The state experience and the human experience. The struggle for sanity and stability in contested space. Constructions of national memory and of forgetfulness. For the possibility of being taken as graduate course, subject to additional readings and work requirements, see HIST 597.

Last Offered Terms Course Name SU Credit
Spring 2005-2006 Nations and Boundaries in the Middle East, the Balkans and the Caucasus 3
Spring 2003-2004 Nations and Boundaries in the Middle East, the Balkans and the Caucasus 3
Spring 2001-2002 Nations and Boundaries in the Middle East, the Balkans and the Caucasus 3

Prerequisite: SPS 101 - Undergraduate - Min Grade D
or SPS 102 - Undergraduate - Min Grade D
Corequisite: __
ECTS Credit: 6 ECTS / 6 ECTS (for students admitted in the 2013-14 Academic Year or following years)
General Requirements:
 
HIST 498 A History of the Cyprus Conflict 3 Credits
The course aims to provide students with a historical overview of the Cyprus question (which entered the UN's agenda as a main issue for the first time in 1954) and various twists and turns it took since the beginning of the ethnic conflict in the island through the prolonged diplomatic processes it entailed till today.

Last Offered Terms Course Name SU Credit

Prerequisite: SPS 101 - Undergraduate - Min Grade D
and SPS 102 - Undergraduate - Min Grade D
Corequisite: __
ECTS Credit: 6 ECTS / 6 ECTS (for students admitted in the 2013-14 Academic Year or following years)
General Requirements: